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New Nobel Centre opts for world’s first net-zero concrete

Heidelberg Materials’ evoZero cement and concrete is based on the application of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology at the company’s Brevik cement plant in Norway
Heidelberg Materials’ evoZero cement and concrete is based on the application of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology at the company’s Brevik cement plant in Norway

Heidelberg Materials to supply carbon-captured evoZero concrete for new Nobel Centre in Stockholm 

THE new Nobel Centre building in Stockholm, scheduled for construction in 2027, is intended to be at the forefront of environmental and climate responsibility. For this lighthouse scheme, the Nobel Centre Project has now opted to use the world’s first carbon captured net-zero concrete, launched recently by Heidelberg Materials under the evoZero brand. The memorandum of understanding between both parties symbolizes an important link between science and the green industrial transformation.

Jon Morrish, member of the managing board of Heidelberg Materials and responsible for the Group area Europe, said: ‘Together with the Nobel Centre project, we aim to set a new standard for sustainable construction and pave the way for other future-oriented players. The collaboration enables us to combine the world of science and innovative solutions from our own sector, such as evoZero, in an exciting way.’

 

Heidelberg Materials say evoZero is the result of cutting-edge technology without compromising on strength or performance, which makes it an attractive choice for the Nobel Centre, which will be a house for science, culture, and dialogue. Built at Slussen on the northern waterfront of Södermalm island in the Swedish capital Stockholm, the Centre will offer a broad range of public activities including exhibitions, school programmes, lectures, and conversations about the major issues of the future and will be a place for Nobel Prize laureates, Stockholm residents, tourists, school children and their teachers.

Vidar Helgesen, executive director of the Nobel Foundation, said: ‘Science confirms again and again that the world is facing an acute climate and nature crisis. Several Nobel Prizes have been awarded both for highlighting this threat and for innovations to mitigate it. When we build a new house for science, culture, and dialogue in Stockholm, we want to act in keeping with science. The Nobel Centre Project is therefore seeking new solutions for material use and re-use to minimize climate impact.’

Solving the climate challenge has been Heidelberg Materials’ focus for many years, and in Brevik, Norway, the company is currently building the world’s first industrial-scale carbon capture facility at a cement plant. The facility will be mechanically complete by the end of 2024 and Heidelberg Materials say they will start supplying customers with evoZero products in 2025.

 

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