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S33 - Workplace Rules

Having a small number of clear, concise rules is important and it helps to set the standards that you require people to work to.

The Workplace Rules Procedure covers all subjects requiring specific health and safety workplace rules. Site specific rules should, where appropriate, consider the following:

  • Employee workplace
  • Contractors
  • Visitors
  • Hauliers
  • Excavations and tips
  • Shotfiring, and
  • Mobile plant.

Each of the sections above contain guidelines on what should be included when developing the rules.

What is this?

This is a written procedure which covers all subjects requiring specific health and safety workplace rules. The rules should be used in conjunction with risk assessments and safe systems of work to ensure that all operations take place without endangering the workforce, contractors or members of the public.

What does the responsible manager need to do?

The responsible manager must ensure that:

  • Suitable workplace rules are developed, implemented and enforced on his/her site.
  • Employees and/or their safety representatives are consulted regarding the content and enforcement of the rules.
  • All relevant persons are given information, instruction and training concerning the workplace rules.
  • All persons inducted in the workplace rules, sign and date an acknowledgement sheet to confirm their understanding and compliance.
  • The rules are displayed at various locations around the site.
  • The workplace rules are monitored and reviewed periodically.

Types of rules required

Site specific rules should, where appropriate, consider the following:

  • Employee workplace;
  • Contractors;
  • Visitors;
  • Hauliers;
  • Excavations and tips;
  • Shotfiring; and
  • Mobile plant.

Employees’ workplace rules

When writing these rules all employees should be made aware of:

  • Restrictions on working at height;
  • Restrictions on working in confined spaces;
  • Isolation and lock off
  • Lifting and manual handling;
  • Employee risk assessment;
  • The movement of traffic;
  • What personal protective equipment to wear and in what area;
  • Any hazardous areas (i.e. noise and dust exclusion zones);
  • How to report an incident; and
  • Any other workplace rules that are relevant.

Contractors’ rules

When writing these rules all contractors should be made aware of:

  • The movement of traffic (one way systems);
  • The site speed limit and any other traffic signals;
  • The location of the car park and any other areas they will be operating in;
  • Where to sign in/out;
  • What personal protective equipment to wear and in what area;
  • Who their point of contact is and the importance of maintaining constant supervision with this person;
  • What information is required from them prior to any work commencing (i.e. risk assessment, insurance certificates etc.);
  • Any pedestrian walkways (access and egress points);
  • Any hazardous areas (i.e. noise and dust exclusion zones);
  • The use of the site’s facilities (rest rooms etc.);
  • How to report an incident; and
  • Any other workplace rules that are relevant.

Visitors’ rules

When writing these rules all visitors should be made aware of:

  • The movement of traffic (one way systems);
  • The site speed limit and any other traffic signals;
  • The location of the car park;
  • Where to sign in/out;
  • What personal protective equipment to wear and in what area;
  • Who their point of contact is and the importance of maintaining constant supervision with this person;
  • Any pedestrian walkways (access and egress points);
  • Any hazardous areas (i.e. noise and dust exclusion zones); and
  • How to report an incident.

Hauliers’ rules

When writing these rules all hauliers should be made aware of:

  • The movement of traffic (one way systems);
  • The site speed limit and any other traffic signals;
  • The location of the weighbridge and any other collection areas;
  • What personal protective equipment to wear and in what area;
  • Any pedestrian walkways (access and egress points);
  • Any hazardous areas (i.e. noise and dust exclusion zones);
  • What they do during the collection of any material or the arrangement in place for discharging material;
  • What they do once they have collected the material (sheeting arrangements);
  • How they conduct themselves when delivering to customers’ sites;
  • What maintenance is allowed on site;
  • How to safely enter and maintain truckmixer drums;
  • How to report an incident; and
  • Any other workplace rules that are relevant.

Excavation and tips rules

The rules should specify the way in which the excavation or tip will be constructed and managed to ensure safety. They need to address:

  • The maximum depth/height.
  • The preparation necessary (e.g. the standard of foundations required for a tip).
  • The provision of drainage and how it is installed, maintained and inspected.
  • The height of the slopes and faces, and the thickness of the layers in which a tip is constructed.
  • The degree of compaction in solid tips.
  • The type of plant and machinery used.
  • The construction standards for roadways and edge protection;
  • The level of supervision required.
  • How defects are dealt with.
  • How material will be removed from the excavation or tip.

Excavation rules will also need to address:

  • The sequence in which the site will be excavated.
  • How faces will be maintained.

Lagoon rules will also need to address:

  • The provision of emergency overflows.
  • Minimum freeboard heights.
  • The operation and maintenance of pumps.
  • How materials will be recovered from lagoons.
  • If appropriate, how to cover lagoons.

Shotfiring rules

The shotfiring rules should cover the following topics:

  • Notice of times when shotfiring is permitted;
  • The warning system that will be used;
  • The authorisation and appointment of key personnel;
  • Surveying and drilling;
  • The blasting specification;
  • How explosives will be stored and issued;
  • How explosives will be transported to and from the blasting area;
  • The charging of shotholes;
  • The control of bulk emulsion trucks (as appropriate);
  • How shots will be connected;
  • How circuits will be tested;
  • How danger zones will be cleared and where sentries will be placed;
  • The firing of shots;
  • How explosives would be safeguarded overnight;
  • How to deal with misfires;
  • How to deal with ‘flyrock’ incidents;
  • Transporting explosives on the public highway; and
  • Monitoring compliance.

Mobile plant rules

When writing these rules all mobile plant operators should be made aware of:

  • The assessment of operators to deem them competent;
  • The arrangements for securing keys;
  • The areas in which they are permitted to be operated;
  • The movement of traffic (one way systems);
  • The site speed limit and any other traffic signals;
  • Any pedestrian walkways (access and egress points);
  • The use of safety devices (e.g. seat belts);
  • The arrangements for operating in adverse weather conditions; and
  • The inspection and maintenance regime.

Associated documentation

  • Control of Contractors Procedure
  • Geotechnical Procedure
  • Shotfiring Procedure

This workplace procedure forms part of a Health & Safety Risk Management System for employers in the quarrying industry. The procedures, which cover a wide range of workplace risks and hazards, can be viewed here

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